Ascension Agreement

A recent agreement between Google and Ascension, a huge national health system, is another sign of how the digital revolution is changing the healthcare system. We are at the beginning of a new era where clinicians will be able to apply the collective human experience in the treatment of a particular problem in real time to the management of each patient with that disease. But critical reactions to the deal – under Ascension, the clinical data it collects on its 50 million patients at Google Cloud, and Google will process that data to help Ascension better manage its patients and finances – show that changes of this magnitude are never smooth. The announcement raised concerns about patient privacy and the misuse of information about third-party private profits and sparked an investigation by the U.S. Department of Health and calls from members of Congress for further scrutiny. It is clear that we are at the beginning of a probably long, controversial and important debate on how personal health information can be managed in the digital age. There is an agreement between Britain and the US to make it work together, but since it is so important for the US, they are « happy » to pay for the work. I guess we agreed, as they did, which is why they`re preparing for repairs and upgrades. Sometimes a research contract needs to be modified due to a change in the scope of work, the duration of the contract or for other reasons. A change is usually initiated by the proponent or any other source of funding and is implemented by both parties. Email suggested changes to research-contracts@seton.org Well, the fact is that, despite its fearsome reputation, HIPAA is full of holes, and lawyers for Google and Ascension have probably found plenty of room in the law to support their deal. On the one hand, HIPC regulated healthcare providers can transmit so-called covered entities personal health information without the patient`s consent for three main purposes: treatment, payment and surgery.

Another issue concerns the rights to commercial benefits that likely arise from cooperation between healthcare organizations and IT companies. These deals will likely produce a plethora of intellectual property that, without patient information (think algorithms and software), will be sold profitably to other healthcare providers and even other companies that develop and market health products (think pharmaceutical and device companies and health plans). Ultimately, however, these benefits are inferred from the personal health information of millions of patients who probably have no idea how their data will be used. Should they have the opportunity to accept these commercial uses of their data? In a way, should they contribute to the profits? A recent agreement between Google and Ascension, a huge national health system, is another sign of how the digital revolution is changing the healthcare system. . . .